Nyamira county government set to publish valuation roll

Stakeholders follow proceedings of a public participation exercise on valuation rolls at Nyansiongo town hall. PHOTO/Nyamira County Comms Dept.
Stakeholders follow proceedings of a public participation exercise on valuation rolls at Nyansiongo town hall. PHOTO/Nyamira County Comms Dept.
  • A certain percentage is set as the rate after the piece of land has been valued, usually between 1%-4%.
  • Valuation cannot be done on forests, power stations, and cemeteries.
  • Citizens ought to be taught the importance of involving the land registry in their sale agreement.

Nyamira county government will establish a new valuation roll once a countywide public participation exercise is conducted to educate the public as per the law.

Speaking during a five-day civic education cum public participation exercise conducted across Nyamira’s five sub-counties, Nyamira county Director for Physical Planning, Lameck Nyariki said that civic education remains key in any government program so that residents are educated and informed on government activities as set out in law.

He added that valuation is crucial to the county government because, through the valuation roll, the devolved unit will be able to raise revenue through the land rates set. This is provided in Valuation for Rating Act CAP 266.

Valuation rolls are records of the value of land within a county, which are used to determine the rates that property owners have to pay to the county government.

Rates are a major source of revenue for county governments, which enable them to provide essential services and infrastructure to the residents.

“Valuation is supposed to be done after five years. Currently, the county government of Nyamira is using the 2007 Act when valuation was done last hence the need for the county government to have her own County Draft Roll,” said Nyariki adding that valuation rolls are important for the county government to collect revenue and provide public services.

He added that the County saw the need to have the rates reviewed thus prompting public participation in the same. The whole process will be conducted by Consultancy Premium, a consultation firm.

“A valuation roll is a legal document that has the name of the owner, user, purpose and the value,” noted Edward Metoh, a facilitator from Premium Consultancy.

He added that a certain percentage is set as the rate after the piece of land has been valued, usually between 1%-4%.

Valuation process

The Nyamira County Valuation Roll Draft will be deemed complete after the following steps are complied with: Collection of data from various marketplaces, preliminary visits conducted, public participation conducted to get public input, and compiling of the data that leads to a draft.

Mr. Stanley Ochieng’ from Premium Consultancy who was leading the exercise at Manga sub-county said that the firm will be looking at the county leasehold land and conduct preliminary visits on the already mapped market centres.

“When valuing land, we have to consider the location that is its proximity to the nearest town or urban center, social amenities like schools, hospitals and size of the land that is how large or small is the said piece of land,” highlighted Ochieng’.

He added that valuation cannot be done on forests, power stations, and cemeteries.

Nyariki said that a parcel of land measuring 50 by 100 is the least size of a piece to be issued a title deed. He added that valuation is only done based on the piece of land without including the structures therein while a card shows temporary ownership.

“A proper structure is being put in place to deal with arrears, therefore, it’s reasonable to only pay the current bill,” added Nyariki.

”The county should onwards conduct focused group discussion so as to get the most from the locals and develop more comprehensive responses. There is also a need to mainstream physical planning in all Civic Education programs, this is because land issues arise most,” said Mr. Gesicha, a resident of the Borabu sub-county.

“Market committees should embrace women in leadership, that’s give them some positions to serve,” noted Reuben Nyabicha, from Metamaywa adding that the county government should conduct a civic education program on matters to deal with land issues.

The lead consultant, Mr. Edwin Metto, said that the valuation process will look for records and maps required and that they will conduct preliminary visits on the already mapped market centers.

Engage more stakeholders

Markets committee members from Borabu who attended the public participation event urged Nyamira County to actively involve the local stakeholders, such as community leaders, farmers’ cooperatives, and civil society organizations, in the process and implementation of the valuation roll to encourage community engagement.

“We implore upon the County Government of Nyamira to align the valuation roll with the broader development goals and strategies for rural areas, such as enhancing rural-urban linkages, promoting rural diversification and resilience, and improving rural public infrastructure and service,” said Wilson Omae, the chairman of Tindereti market.

“Mainstream physical planning in all civic education programs, this is because land issues arise most,” said Fred Mogere, Chairman, Township stage.

“Citizens ought to be taught the importance of involving the land registry in their sale agreement. This is because crucial steps are left out,” noted Lillian Moraa, Treasurer, Bundo market.

County Director in charge of civic education and public participation, Dan Onyancha, said that the five-day public participation across the county will enable the citizens to air their views, be educated and raise their concerns.

Child protection roadmap

Meanwhile, the Nyamira County Children Protection Stakeholders held a one-day meeting Supported by Catholic Relief (Changing The Way We Care (CTWWC) held at a Kisii County-based hotel.

The meeting was organized by the Ministry of Labour and Social Protection’s State Department for Social Protection through the directorate of Children ‘s Services to discuss Cohesive Strategies for Child Protection.

The workshop aimed at bringing together the National Government, County Government, faith-based Organisations, and Civil Society Organisations that work directly for and with Children within the county to discuss plans and activities to support Children in the county and create a venue for collaboration and synergy.

The stakeholders have joined forces to address the critical issues of children and offer a window of opportunity to sustainably improve the lives of children in the County.

Dr. Grace Nyamongo, the CECM Gender, Youth, Sports, Culture and Social Services challenged the stakeholders on the need to work together and aim at a common goal.

“We have come all along focusing on issues of Children and Persons with Disability and soon some Counties will ask how we managed to walk faster. This is truly a show of solidarity and commitment from our key stakeholders,” she noted.

Currently, the department is working on implementing some strategies that were earlier agreed upon at the recently concluded Children and Person With Disability implementation meeting at Mbita.

“I appreciate your commitment to matters concerning the children and county welfare at large. Soon we shall get results,” She added.

Children’s rights to survival, development, and protection are realized through access to quality social services and the adoption of healthy and protective behavior.

This will increase the number of children in Nyamira County accessing quality social services for their well-being.

The overall vision of this mission is to increase the number of vulnerable families accessing economic empowerment activities within Nyamira County.

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They will be able to meet basic needs and prevent child labor, increase the number of children accessing quality healthcare services in Nyamira County, and ensure that the number of school drop-outs is reduced, enhancing access, retention, and transition of children in basic education in Nyamira County.

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